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2007 Unit L


Grade level: Primary
Discipline: Visual Arts

Teacher name
Email address
School or District
Christine Garmong
jestergab@cescowildblue.com
Saint Patrick School
Christina Muzzie
cmuzzie1@pghboe.net
Martin Luther King ALA
Gail Ungar
gungar@southallegheny.org
South Allegheny Elementary School
Glenda Ware
gwilbourn@hbgsd.k12.pa.us
Camp Curtin
Deborah Lieberman
dlieberman1@pghboe.net
Linden Academy

Title of unit: Hello Kitty, Meet Mickey!
Overview: Students will learn about iconic imagery in both Japanese and American pop art, explore the artwork of contemporary Japanese and American pop artists, critically respond to visual culture imagery from Japan and America, and complete a pop art piece reflecting a personal or cultural connection to iconic imagery from either Japanese or American visual culture. This piece can be a collage, sculpture, or painting.
Time needed to complete the unit: Eleven class sessions

Essential learning(s): Artistic icons are an important part of popular culture in both America and Japan.
Summative task: Students will conceptualize and create a pop art piece with either a personal or cultural connection incorporating an iconic image from either Japanese or American visual culture. They will write a written reflection that has a critical and aesthetic response.

PA Academic Standards
Content Indicators
(What students will know)
Process Indicators
(What students will do to demonstrate knowledge of the content)
9.1.3.A. Know and use the elements and principles of each art form to create works in the arts and humanities.
9.1.3.B. Recognize, know, use, and demonstrate a variety of appropriate arts elements and principles to produce, review and revise original works in the arts.
9.1.3.C. Recognize and use fundamental vocabulary within each of the arts forms.
9.2.3.A. Explain the historical, cultural, and social context of an individual work in the arts.
9.2.3.C. Relate works in the arts to varying styles and genre and to the periods in which they were created.
9.2.3.G. Relate works in the arts to geographic regions: Asia, North America.
9.2.3.H. Identify, describe, and analyze the work of Pennsylvania artists in visual arts.
9.3.3.A. Recognize critical process used in the examination of works in the arts and humanities.
-- Compare and contrast
-- Analyze
-- Interpret
-- Form and test hypotheses
-- Evaluate/form judgments
9.3.3.D. Explain meanings in the arts and humanities through individual works and the works of others using a fundamental vocabulary of critical response.
9.3.3.F. Know how to recognize and identify similar and different characteristics among works in the arts.
9.4.3.B. Know how to communicate an informed individual opinion about the meaning of works in the arts.

Reading Anchors
R.3.A.1.4.1. Identify and/or explain stated or implied main ideas and relevant supporting details from text.

Math Anchors
M.3.C.1.1.1. Name/identify/describe geometric shapes in two dimensions (circle, square, rectangle, triangle, pentagon, hexagon, octagon)
M.3.C.2.1.1. Identify/draw one line of symmetry in a two-dimensional figure.
1)(a) know the meaning of an icon
(b) know the meaning of a symbol

(2)(a) know the location of Japan on the map
(b) know the history/origin of the cat icon in Japanese culture, specifically, "Welcome Cat" and "Hello Kitty" and of several American cultural icons, for example, Mickey Mouse and Superman

(3)(a) know the meaning of visual culture and the characteristics of its images
(b) know the simple geometric shapes
(c) understand the concept of symmetry

(4)(a) know the work, "And Then And Then And Then And Then ... And Red" by Takashi Murakami and "Mickey" by Andy Warhol
(b) know the style of American pop artists
(b) know what pop art is
(c) understand the connection between Visual Culture (Iconography) and Pop Art

(5)(a) Know the work of Ai Kijima and understand how her work is inspired by American pop culture

(6)(a) Know how to translate a concept into a piece of art.

(7)(a) understand how to critically examine Japanese art.
(b) understand how artists depict ideas through subject matter and themes.
(1)(a) analyze the appeal and characteristics of cultural symbols and icons.
(b) formulate a journal entry in order to identify at least one icon in popular American culture.

(2)(a) complete a map exercise.
(b) listen to a legend about the Welcome Cat and demonstrate comprehension through discussion.

(3)(a), (b), (c) participate in a teacher facilitated question and answer session.
(a) Venn diagram

(4) (a), (b), (c) formulate a journal entry, sketch, create a pop art piece using an iconic image from either Japanese or American visual culture.

(5)(a) participate in a teacher facilitated question and answer session.
(a) participate in an aesthetic discussion.
(a) complete journal entries.
(a) participate as a group in writing a letter to Ai Kijima.

(6)(a) create a pop art piece using an iconic image from either Japanese or American visual culture.

(7)(a), (b), (c) complete a reflective writing piece that will reflect knowledge of these terms and concepts.

Teacher materials needed:
www.redefiningcraft.com/?p=151 -- Quilted textiles of Ai Kijima
www.artificialgallery.co.uk/index.php - Artificial Art Gallery (Jeff Koons “Balloon Dog”, Takasha Murakami “Super Dob”) contemporary artists website
www.aikijima.com – Ai Kijima’s work
www.warhol.com – Warhol Museum
www.manekinekomusic.com - Maneki Neko (Welcome Cat )
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mickey_Mouse - Mickey Mouse
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hello_Kitty - Hello Kitty
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan - Japan
www.jpop.com – Japanese Pop Culture (music, images)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visual_culture - Visual Culture
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuteness_in_Japanese_culture - Cuteness in Japanese Culture
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/06/14/AR2006061401122.html - Cuteness in Japanese Culture
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuteness_in_Japanese_culture - Cuteness in Japanese Culture
http://www.amy.hi-ho.ne.jp/~mono93/cat/english/history_e.html - History of Maneki Neko (cats throughout Japanese history) -- Japanese customs
http://www.teachertube.com/ - Teacher Tube, Japanese Culture
www.youtube.com – video site
iPod -- Japanese art slideshow/podcast, music
Student materials needed:
Mixed Media: Tempera, watercolors, paper, collage materials, scissors, glue, feathers
Sketchbooks, bought or hand-made
Pencils
Magazines, coloring books, images printed from Internet
Photos of cats
Photos of animals
Word wall -- essential vocabulary for lesson

Unit vocabulary:
Pop Art
Icon
Iconography
Visual culture
Origin
Japan
Maneki Neko -- Welcome cat
Kawaii -- Japanese for cute
Color families -- warm colors, cool colors, primary colors, neutral colors
Geometric
Symmetry
Characteristic
Aesthetic
Critical
Unit warm-up: N/A
Assessing Prior Knowledge: Students should know art elements of line, color, shape.
Students should know color families: primary, warm, cool.

Lesson 1


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Introduction to Icons
Students will view a podcast slideshow featuring images from American visual culture: McDonald's arches, Heinz ketchup bottle, Superman emblem, etc. Students will address the following questions:
o What do these symbols mean?
o What do these symbols have in common?
o Where have you seen these images before?
o What are some other symbols, similar to these?
o Why are some symbols considered iconic and others not?
o Teacher will explain that icons are popular images recognized by most people.
o Students will cut out visual icons from magazines and glue into their journals.
Web mapping
Journal entry
Teacher monitoring for understanding
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Hearing Impaired
a. Put instructions in writing.
b. Face the student.
c. Arrange to have an interpreter.
d. Pair with another student.
Visually Impaired
a. Use large print for handouts.
b. Use audio tapes.
c. Eliminate glare in physical environment.
d. Pair with another student.
Physically Impaired
a. Preferencial seating.
b. Abrieviate assignments.
c. Pair with another student.
a.. Provide key words in native language.
b. Provide images/pictures to convey message.
c. Pair with another student.
Brainstorm/list icons specific to own community.

Japanese Learning Center will have factual children's books about Japanese arts and culture, and task cards for students to complete independently, at their own pace.

Journal Entry: One thing you learned today.

Lesson 2


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Introduction to Japan. History of the Welcome Cat.
o Teacher will show students where Japan is found on the map/globe.
o Students will listen to a legend about "Maneki Neko", the Welcome Cat.
o Students will complete a drawing of cat in media of choice.
Map Exercise -- "Pin the Hello Kitty on Japan" "Pin the Ketchup Bottle on the U.S."
Teacher monitoring for understanding
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Hearing Impaired
a. Continuous re-direction and prompting during lesson.
b. Provide extra time.
Visually Impaired
a. Provide student with an iPod that narrates the Introduction to Japan and the history of the "Welcome Cat."

Physically Impaired (wheelchair)
a. Preferencial seating in front of classroom
b. Arrange classroom furniture so wheelchair can be easily manouvered
c. Provide a "buddy" for assistance
a. Provide an interpreter.
b. Provide student with native language/ English dictionary, as well as a list of key words and picture cards for this lesson.
Do an Internet search to find a cat legend from another culture.

Japanese Learning Center will have factual children's books about Japanese arts and culture, and task cards for students to complete independently, at their own pace.

Journal Entry: One thing you learned today.

Lesson 3


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Visual Culture. Cat as an Icon in Japanese culture. Mickey Mouse and Hello Kitty as Iconic Symbols in America and Japan
o Students will view images of the Japanese and iconic images of Mickey Mouse and Hello Kitty (podcast, posters)
o Teacher will help students recognize the geometric shapes and symmetry found in viewed icons -- Welcome Cat, Hello Kitty, Mickey Mouse
o Students will make comparisons between Mickey Mouse and Hello Kitty, using the Venn Diagram
o Students will create a stylized drawing of an animal, using a style similar to Mickey Mouse and Hello Kitty.
Role playing -- Hello Kitty, Micky Mouse -- students take stances like a geisha and Mickey.

Teacher monitoring for understanding.
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Hearing Impaired:
a. Instructor will face the student and speak slowly.
b. Provide student with FM hearing system or an Induction Loop.
Visually Impaired:
a. Use large print for handouts.
Physically Impaired:
a. Provide manipulatives of geometric shapes along with a handout which shows these components on the icons and images.
a. Provide a worksheet containing geometric shapes in both English and native language.
b. Shapes on images/icons will be highlighted.
Internet search of iconic images from other cultures.

Japanese Learning Center will have factual children's books about Japanese arts and culture, and task cards for students to complete independently, at their own pace.

Lesson 4


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Making an Iconic Image of One's Own (Examining the work of contemporary Japanese and American artists. Making a connection between artwork with iconic images and pop art)
Students will
o View the work of American pop artists including Jeff Koons, Burton Morris, Roy Lichtenstein.
o Examine the work and compare, "And Then And Then And Then And Then ... And Red" by Takashi Murakami and "Mickey" by Andy Warhol.
o Know what Pop Art is.
o Understand the connection between Visual Culture (Iconograpy) and Pop Art.
o Will complete a journal entry to the following prompt: Of the artwork shown, which is your favorite? Identify the icon(s) shown in the artwork. What geometric shapes do you recognize? Is there any symmetry? Where? What color familes are used?
o Journal entry: choose an existing iconic image that had been pasted in your journal and sketch it in an altered way (change colors, distort shape/s, add patterns).
Critical discussion
Journal entry using analogies: "Mickey Mouse is to America as is to ."

"The Pair Game," a card game: Match the icon to the artwork it is found in.
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Autism
a. Provide a picture of the icon broken down into geometric shapes, for example, Mickey Mouse.
b. Provide a clear explanation of expectations.
c. Provide student with 3-D geometric manipulatives.
Visually Impaired
a. Provide student with a tape recording of the lesson as well as expectations.
b. Provide student with 3-D geometric manipulatives.
Pair with a bi-lingual student.
Japanese Learning Center will have factual children's books about Japanese arts and culture, and task cards for students to complete independently, at their own pace.

Journal entry: One thing you learned today.

Lesson 5


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Discussion of Aesthetics of Contemporary Art Images, Japanese and American
o Students will be introduced to the work of Ai Kijima.
o Students will participate in an aesthetic discussion on contemporary images that appear in Japanese and American art.
o Students will address the following in their journals: How does Ai Kijima's work relate to the artwork viewed in the last lesson? Why does Ai Kijima choose the images that she does? Is her artwork art? Or is it advertising? If it is art, Why? What makes the images she chooses valued in her culture?
o Students will collaborate on a group letter to artist, Ai Kijima.
Student will send a Warhol postcard that will ask a question about anything student wants to know about Japan.

Discussion/journal

Teacher monitoring for understanding
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Hearing Impaired:
a. Provide a sign language professional to interpret.
b. Face the student.
Traumatic Brain Injury:
a. Provide student with partner.
b. Preferential seating.
c. Provide with iPod and headphones.
a. Put student in small group setting, with one student from group to be assigned as a "buddy." Buddy will show flash cards with key words written in native language and English.
b. Provide student with list of words in both native language and English. Student will check off words as they are presented by student "buddy."
Japanese Learning Center will have factual children's books about Japanese arts and culture, and task cards for students to complete independently, at their own pace.

Journal entry: One thing you learned today.

Lesson 6


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Production: Pop Art Piece
o Students will conceptualize and create a pop art piece with either a personal or cultural connection incorporating an iconic image from either Japanese or American visual culture.
o Students will brainstorm, sketch ideas in journal.
o Students will begin final project.
o Students will use art materials and tools safely.
o Students will retrieve and put away materials and artwork.
o Students will work to completion.
Teacher monitoring for understanding
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Hearing Impaired:
a. Provide instructions and suggestions in writing.
b. Show examples.
c. Provide with "buddy."
Autistic:
a. Provide a picture of an icon.
b. Provide manipulatives of geometric shapes.
c. With or without teacher assistance, student arranges shapes to resemble the figure.
Visually Impaired:
a. May complete assignment in clay or other three-dimensional material.
a. Provide written directions in native language and English.
b. Pair with "buddy."
Japanese Learning Center will have factual children's books about Japanese arts and culture, and task cards for students to complete independently, at their own pace.

Journal entry: One thing you learned today.

Lesson 7


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Reflection: Self-Assessment
Student will reflect on project, addressing some of the following in a written piece:
What do you like about the artwork you made? Did you incorporate an iconic figure? Did you use the characteristics of pop art -- bold lines, flat planes, geometric shapes? Did you enjoy doing this project? If there was one thing you could change about this project, what would it be? What was successful about your project? Unsuccessful?
Compare and contrast your artwork with one of the artworks we looked at during the unit: What is similar? Different?
Student will write an aesthetic response to the following prompt: How will your artwork make the viewer feel?
Reflection statement
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Hearing Impaired:
a. Provide instructions in writing, via the iPod
Visually Impaired.
a. Provide student with tape recorder to complete reflection piece.
Student may write reflection in native language. Interpreter writes the response in English and provides a copy in English to student as well as teacher. Teacher provides written feedback in both English and native language.
Japanese Learning Center will have factual children's books about Japanese arts and culture, and task cards for students to complete independently, at their own pace.

Journal entry: One thing you learned today.

Rubric


Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Inclusion of iconic image
The artwork contains an fully developed iconic image, used in a unique and innovative manner.
The artwork contains a fully developed iconic image.
The artwork contains an iconic image that is partially developed.
The artwork contains an iconic image that has little development.
Characteristics of pop art
The artwork contains bold outline of images, use of variety of lines, flat planes and geometric shapes. These elements have been used in a unique and inventive manner.
The artwork contains bold outline of images, use of a variety of lines, flat planes, and geometric shapes.
The artwork contains some of the following: bold outline of images, use of a variety of lines, flat planes, geometric shapes.
The artwork contains none of the following: bold outline of images, use of a variety of lines, flat planes, geometric shapes.
Production of artwork
The artwork has been completed in a unique and inventive way; it contains an iconic image, pop art characteristics, and is visually organized. It is structured neatly with additional components included in the artwork.
The artwork is complete; it contains an iconic image, pop art characteristics, and is visually organized.
The artwork is almost complete but requires further development; it may be missing one or more of the following: an iconic image, pop art characteristics, lack of visual organization.
The artwork contains none of the following: an iconic image, pop art characteristics, lack of visual organization.
Written reflection
Incorporates both critical and aesthetic components. Insightful comparisons made between the student's artwork to the artwork of a pop artist, pop style, or image from visual culture. Includes an explanation of how the artwork is personally meaningful. Frequent use of art terminology and vocabulary.
Incorporates both critical and aesthetic components. Compares the student's artwork to the artwork of a pop artist, pop style, or image from visual culture. Includes an explanation of how the artwork is personally meaningful. Some use of art terminology and vocabulary.
Compares the student's artwork to the artwork of a pop artist, pop style, or image from visual culture. Minimal use of art terminology and vocabulary.
Incomplete, major parts missing. Comparison has not been made. Art terminology and vocabulary missing.


Unit accommodations for students not proficient on summative task: Break down lessons into smaller sections of information. Give increased length of time for students to complete activity. Students with writing difficulties may present journaling activites orally to another student or teacher. Provide handouts, large sized visual artifacts for concepts, and activities in lesson. Provide one-on-one and small group instruction. Provide differentiated instruction.
Unit enrichments: Students will photograph work with digital camera and create a slide show podcast to share with the contemporary artist Ai Kijima.
Students will orally record artwork reflections to add audio component to slide show.


Student Work Samples and Teacher Reflection


Christine Garmong
Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Not available
l_garmong_prof.jpg
l_garmong_bas.jpg
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Christine Muzzie
Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
MuzzieAdv_copy3.jpg
MuzzieProf.jpg
MuzzieBasic.jpg
Muzzie_BB.jpg


Gail Ungar
Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
l_ungar_adv.jpg
l_ungar_prof.jpg
l_ungar_bas.jpg
l_ungar_bel.jpg


Glenda Ware
Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
l_ware_adv.jpg
l_ware_prof.jpg
l_ware_bas.jpg
l_ware_bel.jpg


Deborah Lieberman
Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
l_lieberman_adv.jpg
l_lieberman_prof.jpg
l_lieberman_bas.jpg
l_lieberman_bel.jpg