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2007 Unit K


Grade level: Intermediate
Discipline: Visual arts

Teacher name
Email address
School or District
Robb Bomboy
RBomboy@cvschools.org
Hampden Elementary
Marie DeFilipps
mdefilipps@tulpehocken.org
Penn Bernville Elementary
Alexander Miller
am8109@ship.edu
Greencastle-Antrim Elementary School

Title of unit: The Principles of Movement in Japanese Art
Overview: Through the analysis of Japanese art and production of an original work, students will discover four types of motion in art: rhythm, subject, time, technique. The student will measure and create a triptych of three panels which will then be used as a basis for their final artwork which demonstrates three of four forms of movement in a progression in the Japanese style of a silk screen painting.
Time needed to complete the unit: 4-6 weeks

Essential learning(s): Principles of movement can be expressed through static works of art.
Summative task: Students are to create an original two-dimensional work in the style of a Japanese silk screen painting by creating a narrative landscape on a three-panel triptych. Students will utilize three concepts of movement: rhythm, subject, and time.

Assessment Tools:
Students are given a rubric before the project is begun, and are formatively assessed on their adherence to the rubric throughout the working time of the project.
Students are creating a small portfolio containing all handouts, exercises, and any addition materials pertaining to this unit.
The components of a landscape will be assessed in a checklist. (foreground, middleground, background, atmospheric perspective, etc.)
Students will participate in a whole class critique.

PA Academic Standards
Content Indicators
(What students will know)
Process Indicators
(What students will do to demonstrate knowledge of the content)
(1) 9.1.5.A. Know and use the elements and principles of each art form to create works in the arts and humanities.

(2) 9.2.5.D. Analyze a work of art from its historical and cultural perspective.

(3) 9.3.5.B. Describe works in the arts comparing similar and contrasting characteristics.

(4) 9.4.5.B Investigate and communicate multiple philosophical views about works in the arts.

(5) M5.A.1.5.1 Use or develop regions and/or sets (e.g., circle graph, base ten blocks) to model fractions and mixed numbers through hundredths (may include reducing the fractions).

(6) R5.A.1.4.1 Identify and/or explain stated or implied main ideas and relevant supporting details from text.
(1a) Students will know the principle of movement.
(1b) Students will know how to paint using sumi`e techniques.

(2a) Students will know where Japan is.
(2b) Students will understand historical and cultural perspective of Hokusai's "The Breaking Wave Off Kanagawa."

(3a) Students will know three types motion within the principle of movement: rhythm, Subject, time.
(3b) Students will understand significant similarities and differences between two works of art. (Hokusai's "The Breaking Wave of Kanagawa," Homer's "The Gulf Stream.") Students will know where motion is present in the works.

(4) Students will know the philosophical views behind the concepts of: Wabi Sabi, Zen, and American and Japanese aesthetics.

(5) Students will know the 1/3 rule and proportion in the Japanese aesthetic.

(6) The students will know the main idea of wave and shroud and as it relates to Hokusai's "The Breaking Wave off Kanagawa."
(1a) During a discussion analysis of Japanese artwork, students have the opportunity to affix a small paper arrow to the screen on a projected image, indicating direction of movement.
(1b) Students will create a series of brush stroke "sketches." The students will choose the best sketch and create a final, more refined painting.
Students paint a triptych as a summative assessment task to further reinforce knowledge of sumi`e technique.

(2a) Students will identify the location of Japan on a world map.
(2b) During whole class discussion, students will identify elements of Japanese culture present in Hokusai's "The Breaking Wave Off Kanagawa." Students will identify historical time period associated with the art work.

(3a) Students will view, analyze, and interpret a variety of artwork which contain the four types of motion. Students will define and identify four forms of motion within those works.
(3b) Students will analyze and describe the two works of art and examine similarities and differences through the use of a Venn Diagram.

(4) Based on a prior knowledge of American aesthetics, students will compare Japanese aesthetics components of: Wabi Sabi and Zen by generating brush strokes in a series of quick sumi`e paintings.

(5) Students will create a three panel picture plane.

(6) Highlight ryhming couplets within the poem to indicate a wavelike pattern. Students will discuss the meaning of the poem in relation to the artwork.

Teacher materials needed:
All student handouts, digital images, podcasts, and other teacher resources are available for download at this wiki site. Login and use the password to retrieve the files.

http://movementinart.pbwiki.com/FrontPage
Username: movementinart
Password: art

Free Google Earth download: http://earth.google.com/
Video Projector
Google Earth program
A variety of Japanese and American art
Hokusai's "Breaking Wave of Kanagawa" (art print or digital still)
Winslow Homer's "The Gulf Stream" (art print or digital still)
Sesshu Toyo's Flowers and Birds (art print or digital still)
Venn Diagram
"Wave and Shroud" poem (half sheet)
Four highlighters or markers (different colors)
Teacher resource sheet for reading "wave and shroud"
"Wave and Shroud" podcast (see below)
iPod
Student materials needed:
http://movementinart.pbwiki.com/FrontPage
Username: movementinart
Password: art

Free Google Earth download: http://earth.google.com/
Video Projector
Google Earth program
A variety of Japanese and American art
Hokusai's "Breaking Wave of Kanagawa" (art print or digital still)
Winslow Homer's "The Gulf Stream" (art print or digital still)
Sesshu Toyo's Flowers and Birds (art print or digital still)
Venn Diagram
"Wave and Shroud" poem (half sheet)
Four highlighters or markers (different colors)
Teacher resource sheet for reading "wave and shroud"
"Wave and Shroud" podcast (see below)
iPod
Simple portfolio
Summative assessment rubric
World map & vocabulary handout
Colored pencils
Venn Diagram
"Wave and Shroud" poem (half sheet)
Four highlighters or markers (different colors)
iPod (ESL, optional)
Triptych handout
Printed imaged handout
Paper
Brushes
Ink or watercolor
Kanji handout (Japanese calligraphy symbols)
Triptych handout
Triptych handout
Printed imaged handout
Paper
Pencils
Rulers

Unit vocabulary:
sumi-e
Rubric
compare and contrast
art principle of movement
rhythm movement
time movement
subject movement (action)
venn diagram
couplet
main idea
podcast
narrative landscape
technique
Sumi-e specific vocab: wash, Zen, Wabi Sabi
Critique

Unit warm-up: Classroom atmosphere. Japanese style music (koto- instrumental, etc.) and other thematic elements are displayed in the classroom. As the student enters the classroom he/she is enveloped in Japanese culture.
Assessing Prior Knowledge: Group discussion on "what we already know about Japan" and creation of chalkboard brainstorm list including pictorial and textual information. Following lesson one, the brainstorm list is labeled as "true" or "false."

Lesson 1


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Introduction to Japanese culture and geography and and the relation to local culture and geography
Following prior knowledge assessment, teacher introduces Japan through selection of video containing Japanese culture and art-making. Using projector, students are transported to the geographical location of Japan using Google Earth. All students are given handout with blank world map and other key vocabulary. During discussion Japan is to be colored in on the map using a colored pencil. Students discuss how the geographical location affects culture (Japanese cf. local.) Slide presentation of a variety of Japanese and American artwork is discussed. Students are asked: "What can this work tell us about the culture?" Students create portfolios to contain all handouts, notes, sketches, etc. At this point, students are also given the summative assessment rubric, which is briefly discussed and included in the portfolio.
Following "assessing prior knowledge" activity, the brainstorm is marked as true or false using whole group color coded cards. One side represents true, the other false.
Proximity and circulation during coloring activity.
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Adapted rubric for severe impairments.

Learning Disabilities: teacher proximity
Handout provided to reinforce the content provided vocally and on the screen.
Coloring task given to reinforce geography.
Extra time provided for task completion and/or comprehension.
Post agenda in classroom
Individualized incentive program for students.
Visual cues to attend (cue established prior to class)

Visual Impairment: preferential seating.
Use large posters and examples. Demonstrate, provide mat to frame the focus of the work area, provide poem in Braille.

Hearing Impairment: preferential seating.
Have tennis balls added to the bottom of chairs to reduce noise level in class. teacher amplification system.
iPod content available.

Physical Impairments: provide adaptive art making tools.
Hand over hand instruction.
Adequate access to supplies.
Allow extra time for arrival and departure from class.
Use of support staff aide.
Handout provided in translated format.
Partnering
iPod used to listen to translated content.
Extra time provided for task completion/comprehension.
Provided up-to date Japanese newspapers and/or website articles.
Students summarize a current event in Japan.

Lesson 2


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
"The Breaking Wave of Kanagawa": poem and artwork analysis. An introduction to the narrative landscape with a focus on the principle of movement.
Teacher displays a variety of Japanese and American art which must include Hokusai's "Breaking Wave off Kanagawa" and Winslow Homer's "The Gulf Stream," Sesshu Toyo's "Flowers and Birds," and examples of sumi-e work to contrast with modern western works. Class discusses elements of culture in the artworks, and begin searching for the principle of movement within each piece. Printed images with vocabulary are provided for each student. During discussion of each work, students will indicate forms of movement using colored pencils. Three forms of movement are defined: rhythm, time, and subject (action.) Students identify those forms of movement within the art work. Hokusai's "Breaking Wave of Kanagawa" and Winslow Homer's "The Gulf Stream" are again shown, this time side-by-side; students compare and contrast using Venn diagram.
Students are given a handout with the written poem, "Wave and Shroud," and are asked to read silently. Students use four markers to highlight each rhyming couplet in the text to discover the visible. Short discussion on main idea of the poem followed by its relation to Hokusai's "Breaking Wave of Kanagawa." "Wave and Shroud" poetry podcast is then played to complete discussion. The podcast is played an additional time during which the students pat their desks in time with the rhythm. To introduce the concept of narrative landscape (past, present, future) students are given a handout containing an outlined but empty triptych on which the students create their own version of the story as it relates to Hokusai's poem and artwork.
Class participation
Teacher circulation and observation
Venn Diagram
Outline of triptych
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Learning disabilities: teacher proximity.
Handout provided with images of each artwork and key vocabulary.
Students use colored pencils to indicate movement present in each work, following the discussion on the projected image.
Extra time provided for task completion and/or comprehension.
Partnering
Chunking
Post agenda in classroom.
Individualized incentive program for students.
Visual cues to attend (cue established prior to class.)

Visual Impairment: preferential seating.
Use large posters and examples. Demonstrate, provide mat to frame the focus of the work area, provide poem in Braille.

Hearing Impairment:
Preferential Seating.
Have tennis balls added to the bottom of chairs to reduce noise level in class, teacher amplification system.
Ipod content available.

Physical Impairments:
Provide adaptive art making tools.
Hand over hand instruction.
Adequate access to supplies.
Allow extra time for arrival and departure from class.
Use of support staff aide.
Handout and poem provided in translated format.
Partnering
iPod used to listen to translated content.
Extra time provided for task completion and/or comprehension.
Chunking
Additional books and resources on Japan available in classroom if student finishes early.

Lesson 3


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Sumi-e Technique: Development and practice of painting techniques.
Teacher introduction and demonstration of the sumi-e painting technique. Students are each given a large sheet of white paper which is then folded into eight sections. This becomes a practice paper on which the students demonstrates their understanding of sumi-e. Basic Kanji characters and traditional Japanese images are used as a basis for this practice session. Students are then each given a single sheet of paper on which they will choose one image to perfect their Sumi-e painting skills. All materials once dried are to be included in the student portfolio.
Class participation
Teacher circulation and observation
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Learning Disablities:
Painting exercises are timed to create a sense of focus and urgency on task completion. The whole class is guided through each individual procedure (chunking.)
Students restate directions to teacher.
Post agenda in classroom.
Individualized incentive program for students.
Visual cues to attend (cue established prior to class).

Visual Impairment: preferential seating.
Use large posters and examples. Demonstrate, provide mat to frame the focus of the work area, provide poem in Braille.

Hearing Impairment: preferential seating.
Have tennis balls added to the bottom of chairs to reduce noise level in class, teacher amplification system.
iPod content available.

Physical Impairments: provide adaptive art making tools.
Hand over hand instruction.
Adequate access to supplies.
Allow extra time for arrival and departure from class.
Use of support staff aide.
Handout provided in translated format.
Partnering
iPod used to listen to translated content.
Extra time provided for task completion and/or comprehension.
The whole class is guided through each individual procedure (chunking.)
Students re-state directions to teacher.
Students are given the opportunity to paint Kanji on their portfolio covers.

Lesson 4


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Development and production of an original narrative landscape focusing on the principle of movement.
Lesson is introduced by again displaying Sesshu Toyo's "Flowers and Birds." Three forms of movement are identified, focusing on the element of time. This is where students focus on the concept of a "narrative landscape" by looking at the transition from season to season. This passage of time is used to tell a story. "What story is being told here? Where is the past, present, and future shown in this work?" Students are introduced to the final assessment task and review the student version of the assessment rubric. Students are each given another triptych handout on which they begin planning of their own narrative (story should be based on each students own experience or memories).
Final triptych "silk screen" is prepared. Students measure and determine where lines should be drawn to divide the paper into vertical "1/3's" after which the teacher discusses the various fractions formed by combinations of sections on the triptych. Using masking tape, students outline each panel. Following planning stages, students complete work on final piece.
Direct teacher observation of layout and measuring task on final work.
Teacher circulation.
Each student is to describe his/her own narrative plan before beginning work on summative assessment task.
Students will recheck each other in partners in the 1/3's measuring and layout task.
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Learning Disabilities: Direct teacher modeling of measuring and layout tasks as students complete procedure on their own work.
The whole class is guided through each individual procedure (chunking.)
Students are given blank practice paper to test any new images.
Post agenda in classroom.
Individualized incentive program for students.
Visual cues to attend (cue established prior to class).

Visual Impairment: preferential seating.
Use large posters and examples. Demonstrate, provide mat to frame the focus of the work area, provide poem in Braille.

Hearing Impairment: preferential seating.
Have tennis balls added to the bottom of chairs to reduce noise level in class, teacher amplification system.
iPod content available.

Physical Impairments:
Provide adaptive art making tools.
Hand over hand instruction.
Adequate access to supplies.
Allow extra time for arrival and departure from class.
Use of support staff aide.
Handout provided in translated format.
Partnering
iPod used to listen to translated content.
Students could include richer Japanese aesthetic elements in their work. Further study in Zen painting and Wabi Sabi, using the internet, to create simple sumi`e paintings related to their narrative concept.

Lesson 5


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Critique: Selection of student work is analyzed and discussed; the narrative in the landscape is revealed.
Following completion of assessment task, examples of student work are shown to the class. The students are to analyze the pieces in groups to find what parts of movement are present, as well as discover the story behind each narrative landscape. Findings will the be presented by groups to whole class.
Teacher circulation during group work.
Teacher poses questions based on group findings to whole class.
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Learning Disablities:
Group work (partnering)
Post agenda in classroom
Individualized incentive program for students
Visual cues to attend (cue established prior to class)

Visual Impairment: preferential seating.
Use large posters and examples. Demonstrate, provide mat to frame the focus of the work area, provide poem in Braille.

Hearing Impairment: preferential seating.
Have tennis balls added to the bottom of chairs to reduce noise level in class, teacher amplification system.
iPod content available.

Physical Impairments:
Provide adaptive art making tools.
Hand over hand instruction.
Adequate access to supplies.
Allow extra time for arrival and departure from class.
Use of support staff aide.

Students can write a poem based on the content of their own project. This can be based on Japanese Haiku form.


Rubric


Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Rhythm
Intentional repetition of multiple visual elements across the picture plane.
Rhythm is created by repeated visual elements across the entire picture plane.
Limited use of repeated visual elements on part of the picture plane.
Little evidence of intentional use of repeated visual elements.
Subject (Object within artwork that appears to be moving, ex: a person running, a bird flying, a leaf blowing.)
Convincing and realistic depiction of real-time action of a subject "frozen" in time. Subjects clearly interact with the landscape.
Clearly and consistently depicts real-time action of a subject "frozen" in time.
Attempted or incomplete depiction of real-time action of a subject "frozen" in time.
Little evidence of real-time action of a subject "frozen" in time.
Time
Continual and smooth progression of time: past, present, future.
Clearly demonstrates a depiction of progression in time: past, present, and future.
Attempted demonstration of a depiction of a progression in time.
Little or no evidence of progression in time.


Student Work Samples and Teacher Reflection


Robb Bomboy

Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
k_bomboy_adv.jpg
k_bomboy_prof.jpg
k_bomboy_bas.jpg
k_bomboy_bel.jpg

Marie DeFilipps

Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
k_defillips_adv.jpg
Not available
k_defillips_bas.jpg
Not available