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2007 Unit I


Grade level: High school
Discipline: Visual arts

Teacher name
Email address
School or District
Joanne Sinclair
joanne_sinclair@mtwp.net
Manheim Township High School
Sandy Snyder
ssnyder@tvsd.org
Twin Valley High School

Title of unit: Traditional Japanese Art's Influence on Present Day Artists, both Eastern and Western
Overview: After study and critical analysis of the work of historical Japanese artists, students will propose and create an authentic and personal work of art that demonstrates their comprehension of the past and present characteristics of Japanese fine art or graphic design.
Time needed to complete the unit: Flexible

Essential learning(s): Modern artists are influenced by art from the past.
Summative task: Student will create a mixed media art work based on a personal idea/situation employing information and composition techniques learned from traditional Japanese artwork styles and methods.

PA Academic Standards
Content Indicators
(What students will know)
Process Indicators
(What students will do to demonstrate knowledge of the content)
(1) 9.1.8 B Recognize, know, use and demonstrate a variety of appropriate arts elements and principles to produce, review, and revise original works in the arts.

(2) 9.1.8 .C Identify and use comprehensive vocabulary within each of the arts forms.

(3) 9.1.8 .F Analyze works of arts influenced by experiences or historical and cultural events through production, performance, or exhibition.

(4) 9.2.8 G Relate works in the arts to geographic regions.

(5) 9.2.8 J Identify, explain, and analyze common themes, forms, and techniques from works in the arts.

(6) 9.3.8 A Know and use the critical process of the examination of works in the arts and humanities.

(7) 9.4.12 A Evaluate an individual's philosophical statement on a work in the arts and it's relationship to one's own life based on knowledge and experience.

(8) M11.A.2.1 Apply ratio and/or proportion in problem-solving situations.
Reference: 2.2.11.A, 2.8.11.P

(9) R11.A.1.3 Make inferences, draw conclusions, and make generalizations based on text.
(1)Student will know balance, color, and emphasis.

(2)Student will know vocabulary specific to traditional and modern Japanese art styles.

(3) Students will know selected historical events impacted specific works of art in traditional Japanese artwork.

(4) Students will know defining characteristics of Japanese fine arts and graphic design.

(5) Student will know common techniques employed in traditional Japanese artwork.

(6) Students will know comparisions can be made between traditional Japanese artwork and modern Japanese style artwork.

(7) Student will know four of the major Japanese aesthetic beliefs (perishability, irregularity, simplicity, and metaphor). They will analyse how an artist's life and aesthetic philosophy impact the creative process.

(8) Student will know the golden ratio as a traditional Western measure of proportion.

(9) Students will know selected incidents in Japanese history that are reflected in Japanese artwork.
(1) Student will demonstrate the proper use of balance, color, and emphasis in the creation of a set of thumbnails and comps for their final project.

(2) Through a webquest, student will formulate a list of vocabulary words used in traditional and modern Japanese art styles.

(3) After viewing a slideshow of traditional Japanese artwork, student will research and analyze events occurring in Japan that are reflected in a self- selected choice from the slideshow.

(4) When viewing artwork representative of many cultures, student will be able to identify and explain his/her choice of Japanese examples.

(5) Student will research and write a brief descripition of a common Japanese art technique and create an example using the technique.

(6) Given three pieces of artwork representing traditional, modern, and post modern Japanese style artwork, student will create a Venn diagram to demonstrate simililarities and differences in the artwork.

(7) While viewing selected Japanese and Western artworks, students will identify and analyze four of the major Japanese aesthetic philosophies represented in the artwork during a classroom discussion.

(8) Students will explore the golden ratio in selected examples of Western and Japanese art.

(9) Given readings, students will analyze Japanese artwork from the periods represented in those readings in a group discussion and reporting out.

Teacher materials needed:
Podcasts created by teacher to show various art styles and the creative process.

http://www.docoja.com/cgi-bin/keymenuj?base=histg&key=art&dir=dico&gif=hisgifg

http://www.kanzaki.com/jinfo/jart-fine.html#_genid_tophdng

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/fa20060309a1.html

Artsedge (a program of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts) offers three lesson plans:

• Japanese woodblock prints (http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/content/3419/) . Students study the Ukyio-e from its early beginnings to its height in the late 1800s, learn about the techniques and development of this process, view prints from the time period, and create an Ukyio-e of their own.

Art of Japan Thinkquest.
http://library.thinkquest.org/27458/nf/index.html
This student-developed website reveals Japanese culture through traditional Japanese arts (sculpture, paintings, practical arts, gardens, architecture, and origami) using reports, flash animations and picture galleries. Multimedia enhances the user's experience; quizzes and polls allow visitors a chance to interact.

The Virtual Museum of Japanese Arts
Web Japan, http://web-japan.org/museum/menu.html
http://www.brickhaus.com/amoore/magazine/oba.html
The Dictionary of Art, 34 v.
Turner, Jane, 1956-, ed.
New York : Grove's Dictionaries, 1996-
Lilly Ref: 703 D554, 1996
A comprehensive survey of art history with photographs of famous art works; each article is signed, represents a concise summary of knowledge, and includes a brief bibliography. Covers East Asian art, both historical and contemporary.

http://witcombe.sbc.edu/ARTHLinks3.html#japan

http://brownvboard.org/brwnqurt/01-3/01-3e.htm
Student materials needed:
art supplies appropriate to selected project

http://encyclopedia.farlex.com/Japanese+art

http://web-japan.org/trends/arts/art050119.html

Periods / Styles in Japanese History
Jomon c. 4500 - 200 BCE
Yayoi c. 200 BCE - CE 200
Kofun 200 - 500
Asuka 552 - 645
Hakuho or Early Nara 645 - 710
Nara 710 - 794
Heian 794 - 1185
Kamakura 1185 - 1333
Muromachi/Ashikaga 1392 - 1573
Momoyama 1573 - 1615
Edo/Tokugawa 1615 - 1868
Meiji 1868 - 1912
Modern 1912 - present

Unit vocabulary:
Ariso (also "araiso") - literally "rocky shore," a group of rocks set at a water's edge and designed to evoke a rugged seashore.

Batik — technique, common in Southeast Asia, of hand-dyeing fabrics by using wax or another dye repellant to delineate the design.

Bon-seki - the art of placing pebbles on a sand-covered tray, the dry equivalent of bonsai. Some analysts relate the famous garden at Ryoan-ji to this practice.

Chisen - pond (see also "ike" and "enchi").

Chop — the seal used as a personal signature mark in many East Asian countries. In traditional paintings, successive collectors would affix their chop to the work — creating a visible provenance and often adding to the value of the piece.

Edo Period (1603-1867) — also known as the "Tokugawa Period." This marked the last of Japan's "traditional" periods before the advent of contact with the West. A period of internal peace, economic stability, and artistic development, Japan was at this time ruled by a "Shogunate," or military dictatorship.

Feng shui - the Chinese tradition of geomancy, or the propitious location and orientation of cities, buildings, interiors, and gardens. Many of its rules appear to have been followed by Japanese garden designers, although an exact and intentional correspondence is often difficult to prove.

Heian Period (710-1185) — the political unification of Japan, with the first permanent capital established. Buddhism, and Buddhist art, began to flourish, while the influence of Chinese artistic tradition began to wane.

Ike - pond. An ikeniwa is a pond garden (the terms enchi and chisen are also used).

Imari — Chinese or Japanese porcelain decorated with red and gilt enamels.

Ishi - rock or stone. Compounds that employ the term include ishigumi (the arrangement of stones), ishidoro (stone lantern), ishiniwa (stone garden), and ishihama (pebble beach).

Ishidoro - stone lantern

Iwakura - literally "rock seat." A term used to describe sacred stones thought to contain or be favored by kami, the spirits of Shintoism, often marked by a straw rope (shime-nawa). The Shinto reverence for stones is an important factor in Japanese garden design.

Kamejima - Turtle or Tortoise Island. A number of rock formations and islands in Japanese gardens are thought to represent—or at least evoke—the turtle, a symbol of longevity in Chinese and Japanese tradition.

Karenagare - dry stream. Describing the areas of gravel or stone that are intended to simulate running water.

Karikomi - clipped shrubs.

lacquer — a form of varnish used to produce a highly lustrous surface on wood or other materials.

Meiji Period (1867-1912) — named for the rule of the Emperor Meiji, this period saw Japan's gradual opening to the outside world and transformation from a feudalism to modern, constitutional government.

Mitate - literally "a new point of view." Often used to describe something that surprises a viewer, sometimes a visual metaphor or allusion, or something that is not exactly what it seems.

Nagare - stream.

Netsuke — a small, ornamental toggle - often elaborately carved - which served to attach purses or other items to the sash of traditional Japanese male dress.

Niwa - literally "pure place." The Japanese term for garden, a phrase with obvious Shinto overtones. Garden designers are sometimes called niwa shi, "garden masters."

Sabi - an aesthetic term with many definitions, but generally referring to the conditions of aging, both visual (patina, the accidents of time) and psychological (loneliness, serenity).

Sansui - literally "mountain water," or "mountains and waters." The Japanese term for landscape, derived from the Chinese shanshui.

Shima - island, also an early synonym for garden.

Shimenawa - the rough rope that indicates a sacred spot in the Shinto world. Usually adorned with straw tassels, it can girdle an ancient tree, a large rock, or simply an area of land considered sacred.

Shoji - sliding door made of wood and rice paper, common to domestic and monastic architecture during the later centuries of Japanese history. The ability to open the walls of a building in order to provide a full view of surrounding land is an important factor in Japanese garden design.

Sori bashi - arched bridge. Often found in gardens where the passage of boats was required. An arched bridge constructed of stone is sori ishibashi.

Tsubu niwa - courtyard garden.

Ukiyo-e — or "Pictures of the Floating World" — Japanese woodblock prints from the Edo Period, often celebrating the bawdier side of city life but also depicting the enduring Japanese fascination with nature.

Wabi - an aesthetic term which, like sabi, has multiple definitions, but generally indicating a pleasurable response to austerity, simplicity, and even poverty. Like sabi, it often suggests a reverence for things that have stood the test of time.

Yama - mountain, also an early synonym for garden.

Yamato-e — a term for classical Japanese-style painting dating back to the 12th Century A.D., rich in variety and often marked by brash use of color.
a. hikime-kagihana: "dash for eyes, hook for nose" style of depiction used in yamato-e.
b. fukinuki-yatai: "blown-off roof" convention for depicting the interior of buildings, used
in yamato-e.
c. nô: theater which reached its fruition in the late fifteenth century (Ashikaga-Muromachi
period).
d. Kanô School: school of painters whose style was typified in the work of Kanô Eitoku in
the Momoyama period (1568-1615); most of its patrons were elites of
the ruling samurai class.
e. Tosa School: school of painters with a style derived from yamato-e; its most prominent
patrons were members of the old court aristocracy.
Unit warm-up: Students view selected videos from podcasts related to Japanese art styles, traditions, and aesthetics.
Assessing Prior Knowledge: Classroom brainstorm of characteristics of Eastern arts in general and Japanese art in specific.
Have students write down three adjectives they feel describe Japanese culture and art for sharing with the group.
View examples of artwork from many regions of the world and select those that are Japanese style in origin.

Lesson 1


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Japanese history, Japanese art vocabulary, and traditions.
9.1.8. C Through a webquest, student will formulate a list of vocabulary words used in traditional and modern Japanese art styles.

9.1.8 .F After viewing a slideshow of traditional Japanese artwork, student will research and document events occuring in Japan that are reflected in their self- selected choice from the slideshow.

R11.A.1.3 Students will know selected incidents in Japanese history that are reflected in Japanese artwork.
Student vocabulary list.

Student short, verbal presentation of the newly discovered historical context.

Students will generate and participate in a "Jeopardy Game" of Japanese terms.
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Supply rich and interesting texts written for reading level appropriate to student. (Learning disabled visual processing problem )

Supply podcast/vodcast with annotations to student for individual or repeated viewing. (Visually or hearing impaired)
Pair student with native English speaker to allow discussion.

One-on-one meeting with teacher to check for comprehension.

Provide extra visual examples.
Allow student to research in depth a current Japanese artist.

Encourage student to create a small 3-D piece of their choosing.

Lesson 2


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Discussion of aesthetics and culture.
9.4.12 A While viewing selected Japanese and Western artworks, students will identify and analyze four of the major aesthetic philosophies represented in the artwork.
Students will create two word webs: one Japanese, one United States.

Students prepare and participate in a formal Japanese tea ceremony.

Student will design a pattern for an obi or a Shoji screen
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Have entire class create and act out a skit demonstrating a Japanese folktale. (Learning disabled, visual learners)

Supply podcast to student for repeated listening. (Learning disabled, auditory learners)
Pair all students so ESL/ELL student will interact with native English speaker to allow discussion.

One-on-one meeting with ESL/ELL support teacher to check for comprehension.
Create a word web for student selected art movement with aesthetics at its center.

Lesson 3


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Employing information and techniques learned from traditional Japanese artwork styles and methods in a personal project.
9.2. J Student will create a mixed media art work based on a personal idea/situation.
Life drawing of classmates dressed in traditional Japanese garments.

Create monotypes for inclusion in final project.

Teacher observation of student markmaking process.

Teacher observation of student application of paint and ink.

*"Collaged or inserted imagery" is appropriate to topic and task.
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Brainstorming with student to "flesh out" personal ideas and interests. (Autistic spectrum disorders)

Schedule regular one-on-one meetings to check for progress. (ADHD)
Pair student with native English speaker to allow discussion.

One-on-one meeting with teacher to check for comprehension.
Create artwork meaningful to student that includes ideas or situations of current societal relevance.



Rubric


Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Integration of personal idea/situation with elements from Japanese artwork style, aesthetics and methods
-Art piece synthesizes the Japanese aesthetic principles of perishability, simplicity, irregularity, and metaphor with elements of western principles of design to express meaningful ideas of personal and societal relevance.
-Art piece is composed of Japanese origami, brushwork, printmaking, and papermaking.
-Art piece interprets the Japanese aesthetic principles of perishability, simplicity, irregularity, and metaphor in a recognizable manner to express a meaningful idea or situation of current personal relevance.
-Art piece is composed of Japanese origami, brushwork, printmaking, and papermaking.
-Art piece applies the Japanese aesthetic principles of perishability, simplicity, irregularity, and metaphor in a recognizable manner.
-Art piece is composed of Japanese origami, brushwork, printmaking, and papermaking.
-Student appears unable or unwilling to apply the identified Japanese aesthetic principles of perishability, simplicity, irregularity, and metaphor in a recognizable manner. .
-Art piece components are missing (Japanese origami, brushwork, printmaking, and papermaking.
Quality of craftsmenship in mixed media art piece
-Markmaking is crisp and intentional.
-Paint is applied in a manner consistent with Japanese mastery.
-Markmaking is deliberate and thoughtful.
-Paint is applied with careful attention to thickness and direction.
-Markmaking lacks evidence of unified thought
-Paint application shows inconsistent attention to thickness and direction.
-Markmaking is random.
-Paint is applied with little attention to thickness and direction.
Composition
Components of text demonstrate and illuminate the meaning.
Components of text enlighten the meaning.
Arrangement of text informs meaning.
Arrangement of text hints at meaning.


Unit accommodations for students not proficient on summative task: (1) Student will be paired with a peer for guided practice.
(2) Student will be given extended time for remediation.
(3) Student will work one-on-one with instructor.
(4) Student will be given an alternative assignment that allows him/her to present knowledge and competency in a manner consistent with his/her strengths.
Unit enrichments: (1) Encourage student to mentor struggling student.
(2) Brainstorm with student a research project they can complete that will allow them to pursue in more depth an aspect of the learning that they found particularly interesting or challenging.
(3) Encourage student to work on projects for other classes that employ methods learned in the art class.


Student Work Samples and Teacher Reflection


Sandy Snyder

Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
snyder_adv.jpg
snyder_prof.jpg
snyder_bas.jpg
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