2007 H

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2007 Unit H


Grade level: Middle school
Discipline: Theatre

Teacher name
Email address
School or District
Wendy Dagen
wendy_dagen@mtwp.net
Manheim Township Middle School
Nicole Marinos
nmarinos@twinval.k12.pa.us
Twin Valley High School

Title of unit: Culture and Theatrer: How Kabuki Theatre and American Musical Theatre Relate
Overview: This unit will address the relationship of culture and theatre with an emphasis on the comparison of Kabuki and American musical theatre. Students will create a theatre production performed for the community. The production will highlight the stylization of Kabuki theatre and student aesthetic reaction. Student-written dramaturgy will reflect their knowledge of historical and cultural connections and educate the audience of parents and students. Through research and reflection , students will demonstrate an understanding of how theatre & culture are interrelated.
Time needed to complete the unit: 1 month

Essential learning(s): Theatre is a reflection of what a culture values.
Summative task: The unit will conclude with the creation of a theatre production performed for the community. The production will highlight the stylization of Kabuki theatre. Student-written dramaturgy will reflect their knowledge of historical and cultural connections and educate the audience of parents and students. Through research and reflection, students will demonstrate an understanding of how theatre & culture are interrelated.

PA Academic Standards
Content Indicators
(What students will know)
Process Indicators
(What students will do to demonstrate knowledge of the content)
(1) 9.1.8.C. Identify and use comprehensive vocabulary within theatre.

(2) 9.2.8.E. Analyze how historical events and culture impact forms, techniques and purposes of works in the arts.

(3) 9.2.8.G. Relate works in the arts to geographic regions.
M7.B.2.2.1 Interpret and/or apply scales shown on maps, blueprints, models, etc.

(4) 9.3.8.A. Know and use the critical process of the examination of works in the arts and humanities.

(5) 9.3.8.B. Analyze and interpret specific characterisitics of works in the arts within each art form.
R7.A.1.3.1 Make inferences and/or draw conclusions based on information from the text.
R7.A.1.3.2 Cite evidence from text to support generalizations.
R7.B.1.1.1 Interpret, compare, describe, analyze, and/or evaluate the relationships among the following within fiction and literary nonfiction: Character, Setting, Plot, Theme (see Anchors for complete listing)

(6) 9.4.8.A. Compare and contrast examples of group and individual philosophical meanings of works of the arts and humanities.
9.4.8.C. Describe how the attributes of the audience's environment influence aesthetic responses.
(1) Students will know the definitions of scenario, script, set, balance, collaboration, discipline, emphasis, focus, intention, movement, rhythm, style, and voice.

(2) Students will know that historical events and culture influence theatre elements.

(3a) Students will know where Japan and the US are located on the map in relation to each other

(3b) Students will understand basic cultural elements of these regions.

(4) Students will understand 3 elements of the critical process when evaluating theatre; compare/contrast, interpret, and evaluate/form judgments.

(5) Students will know that Japanese and American theatre share similarities and differences.

(6) Students will understand that attributes of the audience's environment impacts audience response.
(1) Students will view a videoclip of a Kabuki performance and identify examples of each of the elements & principles in the performance.

(1b) Students will participate in a series of exercises that will ask them to model the components of theatre, dance, music, and art.

(2) Students will research Japanese and American theatre forms and describe how each is influenced by the culture and history of that nation.

(3a) Students will identify on a world map the locations of these places and will color code them for reference.

(3b,i). Students will discuss what they already know about Japan and the United States.

(3b, ii) Students will create a Venn Diagram to compare the two.

(3b, iii) Students will view and discuss video clips that introduce Japan and the United States in terms of history and culture.

(4a). Students will read and perform a short script from Japan based on their first interpretation and judgment of the work.

(4b). Students will view a professional performance of the same piece. They will compare/contrast their interpretation to the real piece. They will discuss how they are similar and different and why. Students will consider if the piece is art and if it is beautiful.

(5a) Students will complete a graphic organizer that compares/contrasts theatre components (set design, stage, costumes, script, movement, voice) from Japan and America.

(5b) Students will revisit the script they performed. Students will revise the script to more accurately reflect the cultural clues and then perform the piece a second time.

(5c) Students will perform the script again, using the new elements they have learned.

(6a) Students will view a slideshow depicting stage settings from different theatre genres and world regions. Students will respond to the images and list reactionary adjectives for each slide. Students will discuss what components prompted them to their responses.

(6b) Students will analyze/examine the influence of the stage environment on audience aesthetic response.

Teacher materials needed:
Internet Sources:
http://www.shochiku.co.jp/play/kabukiza/theater/ - homepage of most famous kabuki theater in Tokyo
http://www.kabuki21.com/glossaire_7.php#soshu - glossary of kabuki terms
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPgtX-ljHi4 - Kabuki performance (dance element)
http://www.kabuki.gr.jp/pavilion/english/index2.html - Kabuki theater background
http://www.video-link.com/jpn.htm - Kabuki Video (to iPod)
http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761553217/Theater.html - Definition of Elements of Theater

Books:
Various books on Japanese theatre (Kabuki), American musical theatre, theatre elements & principles

Gluck, Cellin (ed.). You Mean to Say You Still Don't Know Who We Are: 7 Kabuki Plays. Personally Oriented Ltd. Ashiya, Japan, 1976.
Toita, Y. & Yoshida C. Kabuki. Hoikusha. Japan, 1992.
Kalb, Dr. Jonathan (ed.). The World of Theater. Scholastic, Inc. New York, 1995.
Mearns, Martha(ed.). The Mikado by W.S. Gilbert & Arthur Sullivan. Franklin Watts, Inc. New York, 1965. (available on Amazon.com & under other editors as well, google search "The Mikado")

Other Resources/Materials:
iPod - with Video Capabilities (30 GB or 80 GB currently available)
Computer with Internet Access
VHS or DVD of American Musical "The King and I"
Video - National Geographic's Living Treasures of Japan (available on Amazon.com)
Student materials needed:
Internet Sources:
4 Part Video on Japanese Culture/History/Lifestyle
http://www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey=712c7d900d1b39e348bbb - Introduction
http://www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey=bed14a48843d74526c11 - School
http://www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey=a90cfdd895e64021e216 - Religion
http://www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey=f2b0e64b472968cb70f0 - Culture

(including websites already listed under Teacher Materials)

Books:
Including text included in teacher materials

Other Materials:
Computer with Internet access
Word processor

Unit vocabulary: culture, bias, stereotype, production, theatre, dance, music, art, scenario, script, set design, stage, balance, collaboration, discipline, emphasis, focus, intention, movement, rhythm, style, voice, projection, clarity, rate, expression, stance, Kabuki, musical, role, character development, choreography, form, energy/force, space, time, form, genre, rhythm, thrust stage, onnagata, hanamichi/thrust stage, seri/trap door, mawari butai/revolving stage
Unit warm-up: N/A
Assessing Prior Knowledge: "What is Theatre" lesson
"Script Interpretation" lesson

Lesson 1


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
What is Theater?
Students will view a video clip of a Kabuki performance and identify examples of each of the elements and principles in the performance. Students will respond to the questions "Is it art? Is it beautiful?" (1 class period)
Oral questioning
Journal notes/reflections
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Autism: visual or verbal cues instead of written, extra time before responding, caring partner

ADHD: partners, graphic organizers, copies of notes
Visual organizers
Student will read the operetta, "The Mikado" by Gilbert & Sullivan. Although it is about Japan, it is a British play. After reading, students will choose one of the elements (e.g., set design, stage, costume/makeup, voice, movement) and will develop either a demonstration, a series of drawings, or a short performance to demonstrate the chosen theatre element in Kabuki style. (e.g., student reads "The Mikado" and chooses to make a series of drawings to depict the makeup of the main characters and their costume.)

Lesson 2


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
SPREC: Public Speaking Strategies
Students will be introduced to stance, projection, rate, expression, and clarity through a series of activities using scripts from both Kabuki and American musical theatre. (5 class periods)
Observation
Demonstration
Monologue
Oral presentation
Essay
Multiple choice
Interview
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Autism: script provided early, allow student to use a prop to relieve tension, dialogue with repetition or predictible patterns.

ADHD: Positive reinforcement, modified activity, demonstration of concepts rather than written assessment.
Visual clues, translation, smaller role (less dialogue to speak).
Student uses a monologue to prepare performance. Student may memorize piece.

Lesson 3


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Script Interpretation
Students will act out a short scene from a Kabuki play ("Death of Yorimoto" - in Book Resources) using their prior knowledge of theatre. Students will view a professional Japanese performance of the scene and compare and contrast it with their original performance. Students will discuss their reactions and interpretations to the script and why they made certain choices. Students will revise their performance to accurately reflect the original intent of the plot. Students will question if the pieces are art and if they are beautiful. (2-3 class periods)
Demonstration
Visual representation - concept map
Oral questioning
Process description
Reflection
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Autism: visual Cues, predictible or repetitive dialogue, "safe place" to relieve tension and stress.

ADHD: peer mentor, character to fit personality (either high energy ADHD or more contemplative ADD).
Visual clues, translation, smaller role (less dialogue to speak).
Student uses a monologue to prepare performance. Student may memorize piece.

Lesson 4


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Who is Japan?
Students will locate and label on a map where Japan is in relation to America. Students will complete and discuss a study guide on geographic comparisons (size, shape, land features, water features, natural resources). Students will create a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast what they already know about Japanese and American culture. Students will research Japanese culture using videos and photos stored on an iPod. They will add to and revise their Venn Diagram to accurately describe the two cultures. (1 class period)
Mapping
Study guide/short answer
Comparison table
Visual - Venn Diagram
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Autism: Copy of notes, partners, graphic organizers (words with corresponding picture).

ADHD: Peer mentor, allow extra time for completion.
Visual organizers
Students create PowerPoint to share information.

Lesson 5


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Kabuki and the American Musical
Students will look at video excerpts from Kabuki theater (National Geographic movie) and the American musical "The King And I." They will question if the pieces are art and if they are beautiful. Students will complete a graphic organizer to compare and contrast the elements of Kabuki theatre and the American musical theatre (set design, stage, costume, script, movement, voice). (2 class periods)
Graphic organizer
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Autism: Copy of notes, caring partners/peer mentor, adapted graphic organizer.

ADHD: Peer mentor, additional time for completion.
Visual organizers


Lesson 6


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
"Kabuki Doug"
Students will view the ivideo "Kabuki Doug" (from the TV Show "The State"). This is a parody of Chikamatsu's "Love Suicides at Sonezaki." Students will reflect on how American pop culture interprets the Japanese cultural tradition of Kabuki and makes it relevant to student lives. Students will question if this piece is art and if it is beautiful. (1 class period)
Discussion
Oral questioning
Journal notes/reflection
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Autism: Adapted graphic organizer, visual support notes, alternative assessment.
Translation, alternative assessment (visual journal).
Students will take a common Kabuki story and create a parody of it.

Lesson 7



Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
The Performance
Students will rehearse and perform a play using an excerpt from "Small House of Uncle Thomas" ballet from the American musical "The King and I." Students will utilize kabuki elements within their performance. Students will create a playbill that includes a dramaturgy. All elements of the production (set design, stage, costume, movement, voice/speech, music) will reflect the Kabuki influence. (3 weeks)
Demonstration
Reflection/essay
Observation
Oral discussion
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Autism: Dialogue with repetitive or predictible words, minor role, pair with peer mentor, provide script early.

ADHD: Character to fit personality (high energy=ADHD & quiet contemplative=ADD), be clear about and practice expectations for behavior in role- e. g., policies on allowable improvisations, remaining in character.
Translation (if needed), smaller role, visual contribution (create costumes, sets, cover art)
Student can be an assistant director and choreographer. Student can be responsible for blocking, choreographic, prop management, scene study, or stage management.

Rubric


Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Clarity, Projection & Rate
Student can be heard from all parts of the room at all times. Words are clearly articulated and dialogue is at a speed that can be easily understood at all times.
Student can be heard from all parts of the room most of the time. Words are clearly articulated and dialogue is at a speed that can be easily understood most of the time.
Student can be heard from only some parts of the room most of the time. Some words are difficult to understand and dialogue speed varies.
Student cannot be heard easily unless seated a few feet from the student. Articulation is limited and speed of dialogue makes it difficult to understand.
Expression/Movement
Student uses many tone & pitch qualities of Kabuki theatre to express dialogue meaning. Movement & gestures are overexaggerated at all necessary times to imitate the Kabuki style.
Student uses some tone & pitch qualities of Kabuki theatre to express dialogue meaning. Movement & gestures are overexaggerated at most times to imitate the Kabuki style.
Student uses a limited amount of tone & pitch qualities of Kabuki theater to express dialogue meaning. Movement & gestures in the Kabuki style are limited.
Student uses a minimal amount of tone & pitch qualities of Kabuki theater to express meaning. Movement & gestures in the Kabuki style are minimal or absent.
Aesthetic Response Reflection
Students clearly articulate their aesthetic response to their own performance. Responses supported with many descriptive details and personal references.
Students clearly articulate their aesthetic response to their own performance. Responses supported with details and personal references.
Student aesthetic response is unclear. Responses supported with limited details and personal references.
Student aesthetic response is incomplete or unclear. Responses are supported with minimal details or personal references.



Student Work Samples and Teacher Reflection


Wendy Dagen

Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Not available