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2007 Unit G


Grade level: Primary
Discipline: Visual Arts

Teacher name
Email address
School or District
Dawn Anderson
dandypa2003@yahoo.com
St. Patrick School
Bonnie Benfer
bbenfer@tulpehocken.org
Penn-Bernville Elementary
Wendy Haslet
wlo2@psu.edu
The Bennett Family Center Integrated Arts Kindergarten
Jennifer Vanada
jlm35@psu.edu
The Bennett Family Center Integrated Arts Kindergarten
Jane Wolfson
jwolfson1@pghboe.net
Dilworth

Title of unit: Japanese package design with origami
Overview: This unit is designed to research different packaging styles and their cultural influences in Japan. We will investigate form and function and research the cultural significance of Japanese packaging. The students will also compare and contrast Japanese packaging with American packaging. A written reflection will describe the sequential steps of creating and constructing the package, Japanese cultural influences on packaging, and the function of packaging.
Time needed to complete the unit: 10 classes

Essential learning(s): Japanese packaging is influenced by aspects of art and culture.
Summative task: Construct an origami box to be used as a package that will hold an object no bigger than 4" x 2."
Write a reflection describing why the origami box represents function, the Japanese culture, and the elements of visual arts.

PA Academic Standards
Content Indicators
(What students will know)
Process Indicators
(What students will do to demonstrate knowledge of the content)
[1] 9.1.3.J. Know and use traditional and contemporary technologies for producing, performing, and exhibiting works in the arts or the works of others)

[2] 9.1.3.C. Recognize and use fundamental vocabulary within each of the arts forms.

[3] 9.2.3.G. Relate works in the arts to geographic regions:
• Africa
• Asia
• Australia
• Central America
• Europe
• North America
• South America

[4] 9.3.3.B Know that works in the arts can be described by using the arts elements, principles, and concepts.

[5] 9.4.3.B Know how to communicate an informed individual opinion about the meaning of works in the arts.

[6] R3.A.2.4.1 Identify and/or explain stated or implied main ideas and relevant supporting details from text.

[7] M3.C.1.1.2 Name/identify geometric shapes in three dimensions (sphere, cube, cylinder, cone, pyramid, rectangular prism).
[1] know materials are connected to sturdiness and function of packaging.

[2] know definitions of geometric shapes and direction words for creating origami, e.g., diagonal fold, vertical fold, horizontal fold.

[3a] know where Japan is located on the map.
[3b] understand basic cultural elements in this region.

[4] know that Japanese art differs from other cultural styles with some of the same characteristics.

[5a] know that origami as packaging can be art or not art.
[5b] know that packages may be functional or non-functional.

[6] know the main idea and supporting details of Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes.

[7] know the geometric shapes involved in creating packages.
[1a] choose materials to create a sturdy origami package.
[1b]practice folding paper over several sessions to examine how precision of folds will affect sturdiness of the package.

[2] follow written sequential steps to create an origami package.

[3a] use arrows to identify where they think Japan is on a map. The correct answer will be given, and important geographic information will be highlighted by teacher (it’s an island, etc.).

[3b] i. discuss/list what they already know about Japan.
[3b] ii. view 2 video clips introducing Japanese culture and after a group discussion will list the cultural highlights.

[4] Using a Venn Diagram, students will analyze a pair of packages with similar characteristics: one Japanese and one American.

[5a] After group discussion - classify origami as art or not art using the response cards.
5a] After group discussion - classify packages as functional or non-functional using the response cards.

[6] state the main idea and summarize the supporting details of Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes in a literature circle discussion.

[7] construct 2-D and 3-D paper shapes and label 3-D shapes.

Teacher materials needed: various paper suitable for origami; IPOD to upload videos and supplemental and extension information and activities; www.keyarts.ws; www.youtube.com; www.kinderart.com/artspeak/japanart.shtml; www.origamistudio.com; www.google.com/images; globe; map; variety of packaging examples; Sadako and the Thousand Cranes
Student materials needed: ruler, paper, packages from home, item to placed in the package


Unit vocabulary: Japan, diagonal fold, vertical fold, horizontal fold, valley fold, crease, package, origami, island, continent, globe, map, square, rectangle, triangle, cube, rectangular prism, line, shape, color
Unit warm-up: N/A
Assessing Prior Knowledge: KWL - (Label a chart with the headings KNOW, WANT TO KNOW, and LEARNED).

Lesson 1


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Packaging (may be more than one day)
1. As an introduction write on whiteboard or project using IPOD - "The first bite is with your eyes."
2. Display a variety of packages.
3. Taste test brand name product vs. store brand.
4. Discuss how packaging affects our opinion of contents.
5. Discuss how packaging is more than just a container.
6. Display examples of packaging that is functional, commonplace, extraordinary, art, and/or not art.
7. Clarify that a particular piece may fit it two or more categories.
8. Highlight the characteristics of various pieces using the vocabulary of the elements and principles of art to clarify why a particular piece is art or not art.
9. Categorize packages as functional, commonplace, extraordinary, art, and/or not art.
Exit slip (student must answer the following questions before being permitted to leave):
1) How do you think packaging affects our purchase choices?
2) Is there a brand name product you prefer because of the package design?
3) What is the meaning of "The first taste is with your eyes?"
4) Self define the words color, shape, line (oral or written).
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
AUTISM
Note the sensory preference.
High repetition.
Use real manipulatives - (the autistic child does not generalize easily).
Use as many visual supports as are practical.
Extra time.
Work buddy (peer/aide).
Provide visual aides, oral, written directions, and translation into native language when necessary.
Create a PowerPoint on packaging from a minimum of two cultures.

Lesson 2


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Introduction to Japan
1. Locate Japan on the map/globe – project world map IPOD slide show.
2. List and record using a web what you already know about Japan.
3. Using a PowerPoint presentation loaded on the IPOD introduce information about Japan and its culture highlighting the significance of Japanese packaging.
1. Students will identify the location of Japan on the map using arrows.
2. Review original list and make corrections.
3. List and record additional information about Japan.
4. Slide show mixing Japanese and American packaging with students using response cards for "art" or "not art."
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
HEARING IMPAIRMENT
Interpreter (if student uses sign language).
Facing student and speaking clearly
(if student lip reads).
Producing all instructions in writing.
FM hearing system or induction loop.
IPOD presentation made available to student.
Extra time.
Work buddy (peer/aide).
Provide visual aides, oral, written directions, and translation into native language.


Lesson 3


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Introduction to origami with Sadako and Thousand Paper Cranes
(multiple day lesson)
-Display new vocabulary from the novel.
-Read aloud Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes.
-Highlight the historical significance of Origami and the transformation from craft to art shown on an IPOD slide presentation.
Literature circle/small group discussion.
Complete literature circle handout.
Categorize as art or not art - show various orgami pieces or slides.
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE
Work in structured environment.
Begin and end class on time.
Use external stimuli to focus their attention.
Behavior modification system.
Accentuate strengths when possible.
Extra time.
Work buddy (peer/aide).
Provide visual cues (story board).
Provide written lesson highlights and critical vocabulary.
PODCAST of the story made available to student.
Provide a PODCAST of the story.
Research and report on Hiroshima.

Lesson 4


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Paper
Test different paper types (e.g., tissue paper, celophane, origami paper, construction paper) to examine sturdiness in holding the same object.
Exit slip (student must answer the following questions before being permitted to leave):
1) Which paper do you think will work best and why?
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITY
Questioning alternatives.
Additional time.
Answering alternatives.
Additional time.
Oral answers to teacher.
Oral answers to IPOD.
Multiple choice and short answer questions in preference to long answer questions.
Extra time.
Work buddy (peer/aide).
Provide visual aids, oral, written directions, and translation into native language.
Circle the right response instead of constructed response.
Create exit slip questions.

Lesson 5


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Origami Paper Folding (at least 2 days)
-Distribute paper.
-Define and demonstrate diagonal fold & valley fold and allow for guided practice. (NOTE: This may take multiple days due to limited fine motor skills of primary-aged students.)
-Practice simple orgami designs to develop confidence (2 or 3 simple designs may include: carp, boat, and, kimono - all related to Japanese culture). Highlight the cultural connection
-Compare student-created designs with teacher-created designs and with higher levels of orgami designs via IPOD slide show.
-Highlight the characteristics of various pieces using the vocabulary of the elements and principles of art to clarify why a particular piece is art or not art.
Follow the folding directions from a partner and vice versa.
-Place simple rubric on board and score one example together as group discussing why it received a certain score.
-Have students self score and share how they came up with their score.
-After viewing IPOD slide show of selected orgami, have students use response cards to show whether the pieces are art or not art and discuss why.
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY
-Teach lessons in small focused segments.
-Provide a sequence cards, explaining the various steps and concepts needed for this lesson in order to help the student create.
-Schedule additional lesson time with the art student to help them retain knowledge.
-Demonstrate patience with the student who is frustrated. They may be well aware that they cannot remember concepts and techniques that they once knew well.
Extra time.
Work buddy (peer/aide).
Provide visual aids, oral, written directions, and translation into native language.


Lesson 6


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Construction of the box (allow at least 2 days)
-Review origami folds.
-Demonstrate each fold individually and allow for guided practice on scrap paper.
-Choose a piece of scrapbook paper and proceed with box folding, having extra paper for errors.
-Teacher observation.
-Place simple rubric on board and have students self score and share how they how they came up with their score.
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
SPEECH OR LANGUAGE DISABILITY
-Interpreter (if student can use sign language).
-Personal computer with voice synthesizer.
-Reader (of student's work).
-Additional time.
-Assign an alternative assessable task which involves written answers.
Extra time.
Work buddy (peer/aide).
Provide visual aids, oral, written directions, and translation into native language.
Sequence cards.
Podcast of lesson.
Design origami paper using Japanese motifs and calligraphy and text (for the Ohio people).

Lesson 7


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Exhibit
-Assemble an origami box exhibition.
-Use a student-friendly version of the rubric for peer evaluation.
-Invite parents, staff, faculty, and students.
Teacher observation
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
ORTHOPEDIC IMPAIRMENT
Preferential seating.
Allow others to take notes for student.
Peer assistance.
Extra time.
Work buddy (peer/aide).
Provide visual aids, oral, written directions, and translation into native language.
Create a bar graph tallying the scores from the student rubrics.
Produce a podcast to run throughout the expo, highlighting the student process including Japanese images and music.

Rubric


Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
sturdiness
The package was built to last and securely hold an object through multiple uses.
The package is sturdy enough to securely hold an object.
Most of the package is sturdy, but there are few pieces that might need extra care when holding an object.
The package is flimsy and falls apart easily when an object is placed inside it.
craftsmanship
The design and construction of the package is neat (free of unwanted marks, tears, and creases).
The design and construction of the package has few flaws (unwanted marks, tears, and creases), but these do not detract from the overall look.
The design and construction of the package has several flaws (unwanted marks, tears, and creases), that detract from the overall look.
The design and construction of the package has multiple flaws (unwanted, tears, and creases), that detract from the overall look.
knowledge of package construction
The student demonstrates crisp folds and precise steps used to make his/her package. He/she includes origami and/or mathematical vocabulary in a written reflection. In addition he/she makes connections to other aspects of Japanese culture.
The student can demonstrate precise folds and all steps used to make his/her package. He/she includes origami and/or mathematical vocabulary in a written reflection.
The student can demonstrate most of the steps used to make his/her package.
The student is able to demonstrate few steps used to make his/her package.
student reflection
Student reflection elaborates on the elements of art, Japanese culture, and function of packaging
Student reflection includes the elements of art, Japanese culture, and function of packaging
Student reflection includes some elements of art, some Japanese culture, and some functions of packaging.
Student reflection includes little or no knowledge of the elements of art, Japanese culture, and function of packaging.


Unit accommodations for students not proficient on summative task: One-on-one assistance after school.
Differentiate instruction to suit individual students.
Unit enrichments: Design origami paper using Japanese motifs and calligraphy and text.
Research and report on ceremonial use of origami.


Student Work Samples and Teacher Reflection


Bonnie Benfer and Wendy Haslet

Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Haslet_Advanced.jpg
Haslet_Proficient1.jpg
Haslet_Basic1.jpg
Haslet_Belowbasic.jpg