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2007 Unit A


Grade level: Middle
Discipline: General Music

Teacher Name
Email Address
School
Janet Ban
jban@mtlsd.net
Mellon Middle School
Cheryl Bush
cbush@sssd.org
Shanksville-Stonycreek School District
Maureen Manjerovic
mplochocki@cksd.k12.pa.us
Claysburg Kimmel Jr-Sr High School
Gary Mishler
gmishler@tvsd.org
Twin Valley High School


Title of unit: Traditional Japanese Music Elements in Popular Japanese Music
Overview: The students will experience Japan either through discussion or guided Internet research adding to their understanding of Japanese culture and music. They will analyze and discuss performances of traditional and contemporary Japanese music. Students will listen to contemporary Japanese music and analyze the traditional musical elements, such as pentatonic scale and use of the koto. As a culminating activity, they will create a Japanese Tanka poem and compose an original melody using the pentatonic scale,and perform using a koto.
Time needed to complete the unit: Six 40-minute class periods

Essential learning(s):
Summative task: Students will compare traditional and modern Japanese music to discover their common rhythmic and melodic elements. Students will use a Japanese Tanka poem as lyrics to compose a piece using appropriate rhythmic and melodic elements and including only notes from a pentatonic scale. They will perform their piece on a virtual or real koto. See rubric for scoring.

PA Academic Standards
Content Indicators
(What students will know)
Process Indicators
(What students will do to demonstrate knowledge of the content)
(1) 9.1.8.B. Recognize, know, use and demonstrate a variety of appropriate arts elements and principals to produce, review and revise original works in the arts.
(2) (9.1.8.C.) Identify and use comprehensive vocabulary within each of the arts forms.
(3) (9.1.8.D. ) Demonstrate knowledge of at least two styles within each art form through performance or exhibition of unique works.
(4) (9.2.8.G). Relate works in the arts to geographic regions.
(5) (9.3.8.A). Know and use the critical process of the examination of works in the arts and humanities. (Compare and contrast, analyze, interpret, form and test hypothesis, evaluate/form judgments)
READING: (6) R8.A.2.4.1 Identify and/or explain stated or implied main ideas and relevant supporting details from text.
MATH: (7) M8.B.1.1.3 Demonstrate an understanding of measurable attributes of objects and figures, and the units, systems and processes of measurement (not assessed at Grade 11).
(1A) Students will know the koto, a traditional Japanese musical instrument.

(1B) Students will know that Japanese music includes the use of the pentatonic scale.

(2A) Students will understand vocabulary related to Japanese traditional music.

(2B) Students will understand vocabulary used in traditional and modern Tanka poetry

(3) Students will know the sound of traditional Japanese music using the koto and pentatonic scale and contemporary popular Japanese music.

(4) Students will understand where the country of Japan is located and know some aspects of Japanese culture.

(5.) Students will understand the relationship between traditional and contemporary Japanese music.

(6) (READING)
Students will understand the main idea of a poem and the impact of lyrics on music.

(7) (MATH)
Students will know the mathematical relationships of musical notation.
(1A) Students will listen, view, and identify the koto from a variety of musical examples.

(1B) Students will perform the pentatonic scale on virtual kotos or guitar with pentatonic tuning.

(2A) Students will use appropriate vocabulary in class discussion.

(2B) Students will write original Tanka poetry.

(3) Students will listen and distinguish between traditional and contemporary Japanese music.

(4) Students will identify Japan on a map and describe cultural elements of the country

(5.) Students will compare and contrast traditional and contemporary Japanese musical characteristics.

(6) (READING)
Students will read, select, and/or write orginal Japanese Tanka poetry and identify the main idea of the poem.

(7) (MATH)
Students will compose rhythms to fit the text of a poem and perform them on an instrument

Teacher materials needed:
iPOD technology to demonstrate audio & video examples to class
Koto / pentatonically-tuned instrument (guitar), computer "Virtual Koto", or keyboard with koto timbre
Examples of Japanese poetry (Haiku & Tanka)
Examples of traditional and contemporary Japanese music
Map of the world or globe
Score of "Sakura"
Student materials needed:
Koto / pentatonically-tuned instrument (guitar), computer "virtual" koto, or keyboard with koto timbre
Staff paper / lined paper/ pencil
Score of "Sakura"

Unit vocabulary:
Japan
Haiku
Tanka
Shakuhachi
JPop
JRock
Pentatonic
Composition
Traditional
Contemporary
Quarter Note
Half Note
Eighth Note
Tempo
Rhythm
Melody
Unit warm-up: None
Assessing Prior Knowledge: None

Lesson 1


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Introduction to Japan, its culture and its music.
1. Identify Japan on a map and discuss cultural elements of the country. Discuss geographic location of the country.
2. Explore the instruments used in traditional Japanese music.
3. List their ideas of Japanese culture (how they view and/or what they know about Japan)
4. View video introducing Japan
5. Discuss the traditional music and instruments of Japan. Listen to koto music.
6. Experiment playing the virtual or real koto.
7. Read and explore types of Japanese poetry, including Haiku and Tanka.
Students make a list of what is already known about Japan.
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Seat hearing / visually impaired students close to media or provide
iPOD for them to use. (hearing / visual impairment)

Provide accommodations to students who may need assistance in playing instruments.
(physical / mental / learning disabilities)
List critical English words used in lesson.
Provide translated versions of media.
Explore internet resources to research elements of Japanese culture and present to class.
Students with personal knowledge, or relatives from Japan make presentation.

Lesson 2


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Pentatonic Scale
1. Sing or listen to a pentatonic scale.
2. Teach "Sakura," a Japanese song using pentatonic.
3. Review basic music composition elements and skills.
4. Improvise in groups or individually on an instrument using the notes of the pentatonic scale.
5. Listen to songs to identify the sound of the pentatonic scale and koto.
Listen to students play a pentatonic scale.
Use a flip card method of indicating choice - listening for pentatonic scales and koto.
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Seat hearing / visually impaired students close to media or provide iPOD for them to use. (hearing / visual impairment)

Provide accomodations to students with physical disabilities who may need assistance in playing instruments.
(physical / mental / learning disabilities)
Teach song by rote.
Make performance opportunities available for students.

Lesson 3


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Traditional vs. contemporary Japanese music
1. Show a contemporary Japanese music video containing traditional Japanese elements.
2.Determine if this is contemporary or traditional music. Why?
3. List elements of contemporary Japanese music.
4. Show a traditional Japanese music video. Determine if it is contemporary or traditional music. Why? Review characteristics of traditional Japanese music.
5.Listen to another example of contemporary Japanese popular music. Discuss whether the example contained elements of traditional Japanese music, specifically the pentatonic scale and the use of the koto.
6. Use a Venn diagram to compare traditional and contemporary Japanese music characteristics.
Each student will complete a Venn diagram comparing traditional and contemporary Japanese music elements.
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Students work in small groups to list characteristics and complete Venn diagrams. (specific learning disability)

Seat hearing / visually impaired students close to media or provide
iPOD for them to use. (hearing / visual impairment)
Pair English and non-English speakers.


Lesson 4


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Traditional Japanese poetry as musical lyrics
1. Introduce poetry as lyrics for song writing. Have students describe a Haiku. Review structure of Haiku if necessary. Introduce a Japanese Tanka form.
2.Have a student recite Tanka poems supplied by the teacher
and determine the main idea of each.
3. Write a Tanka poem as a class group project to set to music.
4. Begin to write individual Tanka poems.
Walk around the class and assist students in their poem writing, observing their work.
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Give visual /hearing impaired students preferential seating. (hearing / visual impairment)

Have students use pictoral representations of words to write their poems. (Specific learning disability)
Make careful selection of poetry considering word choice.

Pair English and non-English speakers.
Give students opportunity to work on an accompaniment to the class project.

Lesson 5


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Composition of pentatonic melody
1. Have students continue individually or in small groups creating Tanka poems to be used as lyrics for their songs.
2. Create a melody, as a class group project , which will be
set to the Tanka previously created by the class. Discuss requirements of composition. (Melody must include only notes of the pentatonic scale, have repetition and contrast, and have multiple directional changes.)
The rhythm must include a variety of note values and coordinate with
the text )
3. Each individual or small group begins to create a melody using the criteria above to set to their own poems.
Walk around the class and assist students in their poem writing and initial improvisation attempts observing their work.
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Students may use existing poetry for composition. (specific learning disability)
Have students write poem in native language for artistic purposes. They should provide a written translation.
Students may use software to notate their compositions.

Team with English teachers to teach poetry class; students may share thier poems.

Lesson 6


Topic
Instruction (Lesson plan)
Formative assessment
Practice and performance of songs
1. Students will practice playing their composed melodies on koto or
virtual koto.
2. Students will perform their compositions for the class.
The teacher will assess the performances according to the rubric.
Accommodations for special learners
Accommodations for ESL students
Enrichment for gifted learners
Students may have the teacher or peer's assistance with the singing of their song. (all disabilities)
Students may perform their composition in their native language.
Record students on iPODS and create music videos of performances.

Students may create contemporary accompaniments for their compositions.

Rubric


Advanced
Proficient
Basic
Below Basic
Melody
•Melody has multiple directional changes and well-defined phrases.
•Melody is developed using motives with clear cadences.
•Melody is entirely made up of a pentatonic scale and uses strong tonal organization.
•Melody has multiple directional changes
•Melody is developed using repetitions and contrasts.
•Melody is entirely made up of a pentatonic scale.
•Melody shows a few changes in direction
•Melody contains few repetitions or contrasts.
•Melody is partially made up of pentatonic scale notes.
•Melody has no change in direction. •Melody has little or no repetitions or contrasts.
•Melody uses no notes from the pentatonic scale.
Lyrics
•Rhythm & Melody enhance the lyrics.
•Rhythm & Melody coordinate with the lyrics.
•Rhythm & Melody show some regard for the lyrics.
•Rhythm & Melody demonstrate little regard for the lyrics.
Rhythm and Tempo
•Tempo is steady and appropriate for the lyrics. •Rhythm contains sophisticated use of notes values.
•Tempo is steady.
•Rhythm contains a variety of note values including quarter, eighth, and half notes.
•Tempo is sometimes steady. •Rhythm contains some note value changes.
•Tempo is rarely steady.
•Rhythm consists of only one note value.
Performance
•Performance is rhythmically exact.
•Composition is performed with no incorrect pitches.
•Performance has few rhythmic inaccuracies.
•Composition is performed with few incorrect pitches.
•Performance contains some rhythmic inaccuracies.
•Composition is performed with some incorrect pitches.
•Performance contains many rhythmically inaccuracies. •Composition is performed with many incorrect pitches.



Unit accommodations for students not proficient on summative task:
- Give students more time to complete the assignment.
- Allow students to choose a poem rather than writing one.
- Allow students to work in small peer groups.
- Allow students to play composition in private.
- Allow students to use graphic or iconic representation of composition.
- Modify scoring rubric.
Unit enrichments:
- Have students video their performances and create a compilation.
- Have students use music notation software to notate their music.
- Allow students to add more complex media and items to their performance such as costumes, additional instruments, video, podcast.